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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
authorities detained mohammed jamal ahmed, suspected of being the leader of a terrorist cell that planned those attacks in egypt and is reportedly linked with the storming of the u.s. consulate in benghazi on september 11th. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton is expected to testify on the libya attack after an independent review board finishes its report. >> so we have every expectation that she will testify, that she will do so in an open setting, and that perhaps the leaders of the report, the lead investigators, may be testifying before us in a closed setting. >> senator john kerry, the chirm of the senate foreign relations committee, says secretary clinton will also appear before that panel. >>> and closer to home now, president obama has asked congress for $60 billion. that's in aide to help with superstorm sandy's cleanup in all states. the request comes in the midst of a tough fiscal cliff fight and house speaker john boehner says they will review the request by the president. new york and new jersey originally asked for a combined $79 billion in aide. the states' govern
it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
mohammed morsi and what they call his power grab, also rejecting his calls for a dialog to end the crisis. the violence there getting the attention of the white house. egypt is considered a vital american interest because of the peace treaty it maintains with israel. we have more on this ahead. but first, all right we are also tracking a developing story in syria. where new video shows the rebels slowly gaining ground in the battle for damascus. they've scored a series of tactical skwreubgt tree tactic tactical victories, and declaring the damascus international airport a military zone. fierce street battles are breaking out as you can see here from the video. the "associated press" released this amateur video and said it seems to core respond with news accounts from the city. foxess conor powell is covering syria live from our mideast bureau. what is the latest. >> reporter: as part of this sur push to topple the bashar al-assad we've seen heavy fighting in damascus, particularly around the airport. rebels are focusing in on that area. in the past three or four days we've seen all intern
mohammed morsi. this is central cairo. that is live look after friday prayers, right before sundown. this is when we see frankly a lot of action in the streets of egypt. in reese days the demonstrations turned violent, even deadly. tanks deployed to the presidential palace late yesterday. defiant president morsi spoke to his nation calling for a national dialogue but he refused to bend on his controversial decree. stephen hayes, senior writer, "weekly standard", fox news contributor watching with us here. good morning to you. >> good morning, bill. bill: we wait to see what happened here. seven people were shot in the street the other day. the ultimate question for me trying to figure out what the army will do. they're the ultimate arbiters of power still today in you get, whether under mubarak or under morsi. if they do what morsi says, then he wins. but if they don't, what happens then? >> well, i think that's right. you're pointing to the exact locust of power in egypt depresident morsi having the backing of the muslim brother hood of the what he did was very having having move w
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
on the left never would have allowed it. he hated hamas. egypt's current president mohamed morsi does not. he is a member of the muslim brotherhood. so the head of hamas was allowed to travel to the gaza strip. that's one example of the titanic shift in politics in this part of the world going on right now. here is another. this is cairo. not during the revolution that brought morsi to power, but now, this is cairo right now. tens of thousands of protesters have been out there for about two weeks in the famed tahrir square and near the presidential palace. they're very upset that their newly elected democratic president morsi is doing things that they not so democratic. he is trying to make it so his decisions are not subject to judicial review. at least six civilians have been killed and hundreds injured in the violence. president obama called his egyptian counterpart yesterday to express concern about the situation that seems to be spinning out of control. he urged president morsi to meet with and negotiate with the opposition. >>> you probably saw a really cool image. a nighttime view of t
become the best friend of the muslim brotherhood in egypt, even as president mohamed morsi was asserting dictatorial powers and his followers were beating up secular liberals in the streets of cairo? when assessing the turbulent events in the arab world, we should remind ourselves that we're witnessing a revolution that may take decades to produce a stable outcome, with the outcome so hard to predict, it's a mistake to make big bets on any particular player. america will help the arab world through this turmoil if it states clearly that u.s. policy is guided by its interests and values, not by transient alliances and friendships. if morsi wants to be treated as a democratic leader, he will have to act like one." and david, i guess we can begin with that question. will he ultimately? can he? and are these fluctuations expected? >> morsi did something that's, in hindsight, a very stupid move. on november 22nd, he announced that he was no longer subject to review by the egyptian courts. and this was read, i think, properly as an attempt to get near dictatorial powers as egypt headed toward
from violence as protests are escalating right now between those who support mohammed morsi and those who opposed him. fierce street battles today killed five people and left more than 600 injured. outside the presidential palace. that is the worst outbreak of violence since morsi's election. the protests began two weeks ago when morsi took almost absolute power by exempting himself from judicial oversights and his spoofers quickly passed a draft constitution. at a white house briefing yesterday, press secretary jay carney refused to take sides or to say whether president obama supports the islamist leader but he did say the united states continues to have an important relationship with egypt. >>> turning to a disaster here at home, the white house says it will send in an emergency request to capitol hill this week asking for up to $60 billion to help recover from hurricane sandy. if approved, much of the money will go toward rebuilding homes and communities but top administrators say they want at least some of the f
on his own people. mohammed jamjoom joins us with that part of the story. >> reporter: state officials have said they believe syrians are loading chemical weapons, precursors for sarin, a deadly nerve gas on to aerial bomb that is could be dropped on the syrian people. monday cnn reported that u.s. officials believed that the syrians had begun mixing chemicals that could be used to weaponize sarin, but there were no signs that the syrian regime was going to do anything with those weapons. they maintain yet again today that they have no intention of using chemical weapons in syria. carol? >> mohammed jamjoom in beirut this morning. >>> sad ending for a month-long search of two missing cousins. the bodies of 8-year-old elizabeth collins and 10-year-old lyric cook were found by hunters in the wooded area. the two girls have been missing since july. jim spellman has been following the story since lyric and elizabeth went missing. you know, i know the families were hopeful till the end. what a saddened. >> yeah, indeed. we haven't gotten official word from police that the two podiatries fou
it is calm in cairo, but yesterday we saw protests for and against egyptian president mohammed morsi, and the planned referendum about that controversial constitution. voting is set to begin on saturday. due to a shortage of judges used to monitor the polling some of them have called this document an insult, so they are boycotting it. it's extended to a second saturday december 22nd. the opposition to morsi which has branded this coons taougs islamist and none inclusive will boycott it. they said they wanted to participate today in a national unity meeting which had been called for by the military. that has been called off today, apparently mohammed morsi didn't want it, bill. bill: what is the expected outcome of this vote, greg, read twaep between the lines. >> all indication is that mohammed morsi wants to push it forward because he thinks he can win. his muslim brotherhood party and allies won the majority of votes in the last elections here. they have the best grass roots effort, they had the best ground game, and the opposition is divided. they are split between their tactics,
earths and opponents much egyptian president mohammed morsi staging massive rallies one day before voting on a draft constitution that has plunged the count are country into a political hotbed. here is the scene. >> reporter: we are on the eave of that crucial vote. this is what it's all b. this is a copy of the draft constitution. it is 63-pages long, 256 articles and it is causing a lot of problems, including in the egyptian city today of alexandria. protestors for and against president mohammed morsi and the constitution clashing in the streets after a cleric urged a yes vote at friday prayers, he's not supposed to do that. rocks were torn, cars were torched, there were injuries and arrests. so far in cairo it has been quiet. the muslim brotherhood, promorsi forces gathering in one location in fairly big numbers. also behind us here in tahrir square and in the presidential palace the critics of the constitution and president mohammed morsi also gathering. so far the two sides have stayed apart. alisyn: is there anyway to proceed ticket what will happe predict what will happen this week
consequences if the political crisis in that country is not resolved. president mohamed morsi is pushing for a solution. but major groups are protesting. protesters have stormed the palace there. >>> and the other winner of that record powerball jackpot has now claimed his prize. arizona lottery officials announcing that the winner has chosen to remain anonymous. but they did say he took the cash option of 192 million bucks. he's married, in his 30s. whoever he is, we know he is not this guy, who was seen in a store in maryland, acting like he was celebrating. he claimed or believed or was faking was the winning ticket. >>> and quite a haul for u.s. customs this week. federal officers seized nearly 36,000 rubber ducks. they were made in china. the ducks, which are decorated for the holidays contain high levels of a chemical that may be unsafe for children. >>> and finally, the story about one mother who couldn't quite make it to the hospital delivery room. bianna's paying close attention here. mercy hospital in cedar rapids, iowa, show a woman giving birth in the e.r. parking lot. that's
about several things. first of all, all concerning president mohammed morsi and this growing perception that he is making himself too powerful. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. >> opposition factions back protesting against mohammed morrissey for nearly two weeks. most of the protests have been limited to tahrir square, but they're now going to the source of their anger, president morrissey, and his presidential palace. >> why come here? >> because it's -- we got fed up. >> he doesn't respect us. he don't want to listen to our demands. >> reporter: what's your message to him by coming out here? >> that what he is doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's complete dictatorship. >> reporter: at one point there were tense moments when protests clashed with police and broke through a police barrier, but things called down pretty quickly. the president in no danger. he left at some point. the protests continue empassioned but peaceful. there you hear the chants of dictator, dictator. like much of egypt, most of these people are muslims, but you'll also find the moderates,
's referendum vote on a divisive new constitution. it was drafted largely by allies of mohamed morsi. an egyptian spoke men said that they will aim at ending the political crisis. >>> and a global call for countries to lift their hiv travel restrictions. 45 nations seen on this map have laws that deport, detain, or deny entry to people who are hiv positive. now companies like coca-cola and gap and from the nba say those travel bans are discriminatory and bad for business. until recently, the u.s., too, had regular layings that barred foreign nationals from receiving a visa from entering the country. president obama lifted that ban in 2010. >>> and a chain of check stores is selling what they believe is the, yes, very last shipment of twinkies in the country. jewel said that hostess offered the entire shipment left in the georgia plant, including 20,000 boxes of twinkies and 5,000 boxes of ding dongs, zingers and you can buy them while supplies last but not for much longer. if you're thinking of the gift to give someone, just don't know what to get them, give them a twinkie. >> when w
. i'm chris hayes. a draft of egypt's new constitution will be delivered to president mohamed morsi today. private first class bradley manning accused of leaking classified documents to wikileaks will return to court in fort meade maryland. right now i'm joined by richard a renberg. allen frumin who retired as parliamentarian of the u.s. senate last year. this is his first interview since then. akil amar and sterling professor of law at yale law school. and msnbc contributor, victoria defrancesco soto. great to have you all here. all right. if president obama wants to get anything done in his second term, democrats in the senate will have to overcome one major obstacle, the filibuster. since democrats took control of both chambers of congress in 2007, republicans have used the filibuster as a bludgeon against them to pass basic legislation. the senate bills that actually passed has dropped from just over 25% to a record low of 2.8% this year. the rate held steady at 10% through the clinton and bush years and then plummeted when democrats took control of congress in 2007. that is due
those for and against president mohamed morsi after he gave himself unchecked powers last month. the opposition is calling for new nationwide protests ahead of the vote. >>> and the nobel peace prize has been given to the european union. the three presidents of the eu's main bodies accepted the prestigious award this morning at a ceremony in oslo, norway, but this year's choice was not without controversy. three former nobel laureates wrote a letter of protest saying the union doesn't qualify as a peace maker. >>> for the second time in two weekds, an nfl team overcomes the death of a teammate with a victory on the field. this time it was the dallas cowboys. on the sidelines sunday, the jersey of jerry brown jr. was draped over the team bench. a member of the practice squad, brown died saturday in a car crash driven by a teammate, the car was. the cowboys came back from a nine-point deficit to beat the cincinnati bengals on a dramatic last second field goal. brown's jersey was held up after the emotional win, and following the game, cowboys head coach jason garrett talked about
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
, the response is nothing. mohammed's son tells us, "today, i sent my brother to get bread at 6:00 a.m." look, it's 3:00 p.m. right now and he hasn't gotten any. the kids haven't eaten." the power is out, as it has been for weeks. and now the water is cut as well. there is a growing sense of desperation among people here. stalked by both hunger and danger. "god gave me these children. these children are my responsibility," the man laments. now i can't even get them a loaf of bread. before, i could. now, i can't. the price of bread has skyrocketed due to a flour shortage. along with it, a population's anger. the situation is so dire that people say society is beginning to disintegrate. this is yet another bread line. we were just at one further up the road where the crowd ended up mobbing around us, furious. they said that they wanted us to leave because they were fed up with people filming them. they feel as if the world is simply mocking their misery. and just four days, the cost of fuel jumped from 85 syrian pounds to 150. but beyond the now astronomical cost of survival, it's the constant fear
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just pas
the will -- >> these conditions that mohammed has put forward are unacceptable? >> everything could be discussed on the table, but not conditions. >> he says -- what about, are you open at least to postponing the referendum on the c constituti constitution? moving from december 15th? >> if we are returning back to the will of the people. why should we be -- we can change the constitution, if there is the will of the people to change it. and today it was announced that if there is a need for amendments we can elect a new parliament, and within the new parliament, they have the right to make changes to the prosecution. we insist on returning to the people. the regional source of power. >> the argument -- the accusation that's been made is that president morsi, he was democratically elected. he got just more than 51% of the vote, which is enough to get him elected president of egypt the first election in egypt ever shall we say. he's beginning to act like a dictator. >> well, i think this is unacceptable conditions. he is insisting on carrying on with the democratic process. he's devolving his powers, returning
. abc's mohamed lila has the story. >> reporter: she's the innocent baby girl trapped in a bitter custody battle. on one side, the girl's biological father. on the other her adoptive parents. terry is a staff sergeant in the u.s. army. two years ago while stationed in south carolina his now ex-wife tyra bland was giving birth in utah. he says he had no clue he was never told he was going to be a father or that his baby girl had been put up for adoption. >> she has a right to be able to be with her father. that was taken away. >> reporter: his attorney says his ex-wife intentionally gave the adoption agency the wrong contact information meaning they could never reach him for his consent. >> he knew i was pregnant. he left while i was showing. i was 7 months pregnant. i lived this. i lived this for three days straight. i lived in that home with no food with my baby girl. >> reporter: the judge ordered the girl's adoptive parents, jared and christie frye to give the girl back within 60 days. but they aren't giving in. their lawyers telling abc news in a statement -- they believe the
by the egyptian president mohammed morsi. it is expected to take place at any time. we're told that during the day he met with the army chief as well as his ministers to try to come up with some way to stablize the country. he was in the presidential palace earlier in the day. this despite the fact that there was some very violent clashes in the last 24 hours just outside that palace. take a look at the tape and you can see what took place just a few hours ago. on one side supporters of th president morsi. on the other secular groups say they oppose the islamist agenda. during the clashes firebombs and rocks were thrown. there was also gunfire. as you mentioned at least seven dead and at least 600 injured. the republican guard placed tanks and armored vehicles outside the presidential palace this morning and the commander of the guard which is primarily tasked with protecting the presidential compound tried to assure egyptians in this conflict it is not going to take sides. in the last few hours the guard ordered rival protesters to leave the presidential palace. morsi supporters have withdrawn an
. >> oh okay. i think we're very lucky your dog didn't eat your plastic boll of the profit mohammed. >> stephanie: yes. kids. kids. i have a love story. [♪ romantic music ♪] [overlapping speakers] >> stephanie: it's a holiday gift with the maji -- >> don't be a wise guy. >> stephanie: listen -- >> three wise guys -- >> stephanie: there was a very touching story -- >> my grandfather was a wise guy -- >> stephanie: like my dog got the baby jesus out -- [ farting sounds ] >> stephanie: this is from scuba drew. [ scooby-doo's "huh?" ] >> stephanie: aloha momma. my wife and i first started watching you when you aired on current tv you brought many laughs to me and my wife so much, i wanted to surprise my wife for christmas, so i ordered a sexy liberal hat and coffee cup. >> nice. >> stephanie: today the package arrived and i snuck it inside. opened it up. and discovered that it contained a larry the lizard coffee cup, and so i looked at the receipt, and i realized it was ordered from my wife and not me. >> oooooooooh. [overlapping speakers] >> stephanie: and now
of the egypt presidential palace and sprayed graffiti. demonstrators threw rocks at the home of mohamed morsi, furious over his decree expanding his powers, putting it beyond judicial review. the opposition is demanding he postpone a december 15 referendum on a draft constitution. critics fear the charter would help the islamist dominated government consolidate its power. >>> an a powerful earthquake struck on japan's northeast coast today. 7.3 magnitude quake shook buildings in tokyo. looking at video there. it triggered a three foot tsunami wave. japan is still recovering from a massive earthquake you remember and tsunami that killed more than 15,000 people last year. >>> wow. the owner of this jewelry store in georgia says it's a miracle no one was killed when this happened. a driver accidentally rammed her minivan into the store. she told police a cannister lodged against the gas pedal. flying glass hit customers, one woman had a deep cut in the back of her head. the store had $30,000 in damage, but thank goodness no one was seriously, seriously injured or killed. look at that, wolf. wow.
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
is here. she's picking up that part of the story. >> embattled president mohammed morsi went on nationwide tv. he addressed the protests. he seemed to inflamed their outrage. within minutes, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in cairo was up in flames. reza joins us on the phone from cairo. we want to talk about president morsi in a second. first, you just arrived at the scene of the fire at the muslim brotherhood headquarters. what are you seeing, and what are you learning about who's responsible for this? >> reporter: let's verify what happened. two hours ago, they reported the main headquarters here in cairo was attacked by protesters and torched. we raced over here. we're in front of the headquarters right now. there's no indication of a fire here, but certainly there's a large group of what appear to be opponents of president morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they're trying to do everything they can to get to this building, and they're being blocked by police. so we have yet another standoff. if anyone thought president morsi's speech would pacify these people and calm them down, thi
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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